Professional Development

A. Activity Explanation: High-Frequency Words

A. Activity Explanation: High-Frequency Words

High frequency words are words that occur again and again (e.g,. to, from, and, see, etc.).
The use of sentence frames with pictures and/or puppets to practice reading high-frequency words is explained. The use of pictures and puppets along with the sentence provides context to give meaning to the high-frequency words. High-frequency words are practiced in context so students become more familiar with them as they are read again and again until they are recognized automatically. Students also practice sentence structure and vocabulary.

B. Activity Demonstration: High-Frequency Words

B. Activity Demonstration: High-Frequency Words

To help the reader recognize the word, it is important to use the high-frequency words in meaningful contexts with pictures and puppets. The instructor in the video reads a carrier phrase from the book or related to the book the student will read. The high-frequency words are in the sentence with a blank. Each time a new word is substituted in the blank, the students get additional practice with vocabulary, sentence structure, and reading the high frequency words.

C. Activity Explanation: Cut-Up Sentences

C. Activity Explanation: Cut-Up Sentences

In this video, the instructor explains an activity to do after students have read the text. In this activity, students have to apply what they know about words, sentences, punctuation and capitalization to put sentences back together so they make sense.

To prepare, individual sentences from the book are printed on sentence strips and then cut up into individual words keeping the punctuation and capitalization. The teacher models how to prompt students to use strategies to figure out the word order.
The first word in a sentence has a capital/uppercase letter.
The last word in a sentence is followed by punctuation.
Nouns are cued with the word the.
Use question prompts like, “What does the cat do in the story?”
Ask, “Does that make sense?”

D. Activity Demonstration: Cut-Up Sentences

D. Activity Demonstration: Cut-Up Sentences

The instructor in this video models how to guide a student to use strategies to put a cut-up sentence back together. The student is asked to read the words out of order and determine whether or not they make sense. The teacher gives the student feedback on her attempts at constructing a sentence that makes sense. The instructor points out the punctuation and capitalization, and has the student read back the words each time before making another decision about word order. Finally, the student is prompted with questions (e.g., “Where does the cat nap?”) When the student is satisfied with the sentence, she reads the whole sentence to the teacher. The teacher asks, “Does that make sense?”

With a group of students, the teacher can pass out a different sentence to each student, and then give feedback as students complete their sentence. After students finish and receive feedback from the teacher, they can switch sentences.